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  • Future

    GUEST PROJECTS: Barry Sykes, “It Must Be Told.”

    BatteryPoweredCandleLampGlueGunComicSansMarketingGold FINALA dramatisation of Barry’s current research into a 1980/1890s ghost play, utilising stage directions, makeshift props and Microsoft PowerPoint. Adapted from a performance lecture originally commissioned by Arnolfini for ’4 Days: Curtain Call’ (September 2013).

    Performances May 23 and 24 FREE booking essential.

    ENCLAVE GALLERY: Detours: After Detournement

    Preview April 25th

    Detours detournement Ross Downes Enclave Deptford

    Preview April 25th 2014 6-9pm + afterparty
    Exhibition continues to Saturday May 17th
    Open Wednesday to Saturday, 12-6pm

    Jesse Ash / Johan Arens / Simon Bedwell / Sophie Carapetian / Toby Christian / Mike Cooter / Tom Crawford / Frauke Dannert / Nick Downes / Ruth Ewan / Famed / Daniel Griffiths / Mark Hamilton / Rory Macbeth / Neil Mulholland / Kate Owens / Laure Prouvost / Bob And Roberta Smith / Cristopher Kulendran Thomas / Emily Wardill / Rehana Zaman / Curated by Ross Downes.

    ARCHIVE COMING SOON.

    Today

    NO FUN: Seán Cummins / Jo Mitchell / Mark PearsonENCLAVE GUEST PROJECTS 5
    Dust – Lee Maelzer 8
    Third Text 10
    • Victory Press

      Victory press is a small publisher & printer. We print using a Risograph RZ570 digital duplicator with 10 colours. We publish limited edition artist books and print editions using various print methods.

      Read more..

      Victory press is a small publisher & printer. We print using a Risograph RZ570 digital duplicator with ten colours. We publish limited edition artist books and print editions using various print methods.

      Victory Press Elliott Denny Enclave DeptfordRisograph printing is a vibrant and economical method of producing anything from books to artist prints. It sits in the realm somewhere between screen print and offset lithography but with a unique aesthetic.

      We can print on most uncoated papers. We only have a limited range of stock and order in for most big jobs. We would prefer to test the stock you have in mind first. As soy ink can struggle to dry on certain stocks. We can also print on envelopes

      As the complexity of all print jobs vary we have no rigid price list, we quote based on each job individually. We are happy to provide you with quote, Please email with the following specified: Description, number of colours, quantity, intended paper weight, paper size.

      hello@victorypress.co.uk
      www.victorypress.co.uk

      Background image: Tom Edwards, Nine Tales, 4 & 5 colour Riso, 285 X 390mm. Edition of 100

    • Tom Edwards Nine Tales 4 & 5 colour Riso 285 X 390mm Victory Press
    • Runnin Down a Dream DJ Roberts

      7th January- 15th February

      OCCUPY MY TIME GALLERY PRESENTS RUNNIN’ DOWN A DREAM DJ ROBERTS Private View  Tuesday 7th January 6.00pm-9.00pm Exhibition continues until 15th February SLAM Evening 31st January 6.00-9.00pm    The suburbs have always fascinated D J Roberts. More varied and surprising than you think, [...]

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      OCCUPY MY TIME GALLERY

      PRESENTS

      RUNNIN’ DOWN A DREAM

      DJ ROBERTS

      Private View  Tuesday 7th January 6.00pm-9.00pm

      Exhibition continues until 15th February

      SLAM Evening 31st January 6.00-9.00pm 

       Inline images 1

      The suburbs have always fascinated D J Roberts. More varied and surprising than you think, they are a breeding ground for fantasy and anticipation, for dreams fulfilled and dreams yet to be explored. And their mix of the aspirational, the enigmatic and the downright odd encourages a response more than usually conditioned by our state of mind, by what we have seen and experienced elsewhere.

      D J Roberts is a graduate of Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, London. Solo exhibitions include Half built edges, Point Blank andWhat Is It About The Place,  Lounge Gallery. Group exhibitions include New York Art Book Fair, MoMA PSI; The Things of Life, Flowers Kingsland Road; Crash, Charlie Dutton Gallery; Temples 2 the Domestic, Clifford Chance;  Moral Plinth, Beaconsfield; Contemporary British Painting Pt 1, Hastings Museum  and Art Gallery;  Mostyn 15 and 13, Oriel Mostyn Gallery and the Jerwood Drawing Prize, Jerwood Space and tour. Over the next four months his neon installation I’m in love with the modern world will form part of the London Borough of Waltham Forest’s public art initiative for the development of Walthamstow Town Centre.

       

      D J Roberts would like to thank James Brooks, Sebastian Sharples and Nick Malyon for their assistance in the preparation of the show.

       

      OCCUPY MY TIME GALLERY

      Director Sue Cohen Enclave

      9 Resolution Way Deptford SE8 4AL

      Contact Sue Cohen for further details at suecohen@ntlworld.com Tel: 07931 536327

      www.occupymytimearts.yolasite.com www.omtgallery.tumblr.com

      Open Wed – Sat : 10am – 5pm

      Nearest Train Station: Deptford: Overground. Deptford Bridge: DLR New Cross: London Overground. Bus: 188, 47, 199

    • Dust – Lee Maelzer

      28 February - 19 April

      Private View: Friday 28 March, 6-9.30pm
      Exhibition Dates: 28 February – 19 April, Thursday to Saturday, 12.30-5.30pm

      www.lubomirov-easton.com

      The London-based artist is well known for putting used things and redundant sites to poetic purpose on canvas. Maelzer remains interested in the significance of matter and site to the common experiences and signature rituals that connect us.

      Read more..

      Private View: Friday 28 March, 6-9.30pm
      Exhibition Dates: 28 February – 19 April, Thursday to Saturday, 12.30-5.30pm

      www.lubomirov-easton.com

      The London-based artist is well known for putting used things and redundant sites to poetic purpose on canvas. Maelzer remains interested in the significance of matter and site to the common experiences and signature rituals that connect us.
      The large skies and eerie horizons of earlier works encouraged one to linger in a cinematic twilight, contemplating the curious stylistics of the frozen image that can imbue the everyday with melancholy or wring a creepiness from the most mundane of details. With the latest body of paintings, Maelzer tinkers evermore cannily with the thresholds between painted and printed surface; image and scape. The eye requires adjustment time to make sense of pathologically observed auto-focused details, or slight, seductively described states of dematerialisation.

      As the title of this exhibition, DUST, implies, she has become increasingly drawn to the glitches, the image anomalies sometimes inherent within the print, though more recently of her own making, that lift generic photos (familiar scenes or evidence of life’s repetitive markers) out of the mass archival soup.

      She uses the compositional constructs at her disposal – as much from the history of painting as film-making and photography – in ways that speak of the power and the failings of words to describe emotional responses to things and places. The perfunctory scene often forms the structural basis for her investigation into the shape and significance of memories. Though her works often appear faithful to the observation of real places her allegiance is not with the pursuit of visual truth, but to the altered states of time capture – those trapped in photographs or in the mind itself.

      Maelzer’s current mode of image de/reconstruction (whether of those found or framed by the lens of her own camera), might be described as creative sabotage for she exposes photographic surfaces to acidic chemicals — as if to stress-test the pictorial composition, perhaps, or excavate the material and associative layers contained. This curiously destructive yet ultimately useful approach — and the beautiful banality of the results — help one to situate Maelzer’s concerns amongst those that dog other painters of the mediated image. Where Gerhard Richter has sought to highlight the glossy, corruptible skin of images to frame the Wizard of Oz mechanisms of the media, for example, Maelzer implicates herself within the ruse – of where one form of representation ends and another begins – communicating the difficulties of processing data in a decontextualised image culture. Her effervescent treatment of the source proves to be both the undoing and the salvation of the content: a seltzer dissolution of the ordinary that serves to subtly loosen photography’s technological hold over how it was and the wider brass-eye significance of the medium to recent history. Each image appears styled as if by the selective processes of archiving experience to memory. Maelzer slips in and out of painterly techniques and compositional devices as if in search of what painting from life means in an era lived, to an increasing extent, on screen.

      Wilhelm Sasnal is, perhaps, a more closely related contemporary, not in terms of his visual vernacular but the desire to get amongst the time-based atoms of images and interpret the experience through paint. Amongst the many poetic revelations of Maelzer’s notes (a veritable love letter to research) sparkle two footnotes of particular relevance to this reductionist position. The first describes her childhood fascination for magazine pages: their high-colour irreality prompting exploration of the image surface, a desire to rub away the synthetic top layer beneath which Maelzer felt sure lurked evidence of a life she could relate to.

      Where the aesthetic strategies of Richter and Sasnal often engage the viewer’s emotional response in the manner of a controlled experiment, affording one the necessary analytical distance from the image and its primary context, Maelzer makes one believe that each site rendered, no matter how ruined, is of explicit personal importance to someone, if not herself. This is to some extent set in motion by the tenderness of her paint application: rendered as if the last recorded mental snapshot of a life cut short by a road accident. However green Maelzer’s paintings might become they are essentially cut from the grubby fabric of everyday London life: hidden details, sites between purpose or buildings overgrown, temporarily lost from view or razed to the ground and reorganised into piles of matter. Verdigris could not be described this way, detritus captured so hauntingly without an intimate personal knowledge of the city.

      But one should not underestimate the impact of Maelzer’s ability to blur the boundaries between the practical necessities of craft, in terms of constructing an image of ‘real’ life, and the technological or acid-induced quirks of the original. Maelzer is acutely aware of the particular effect that representations of the real, reconfigured by hand, have on the viewer. And, the communicative possibilities of the medium as a material link between the past and the present. How a smudgy swatch of an indescribable grey, or a flurry of marks might open an associative portal connecting, say, the light of Lynch’s America on film with the full-fat austerity of Morandi’s object studies; the cellular spread of Corot’s foliage with the voyeuristic eye of contemporary urban TV drama.

      Text by Rebecca Geldard

      Curated by Iavor Lubomirov and Bella Easton.

    • Livid Sink, 2014, oil on canvas
    • The Groundnut (residency)

      The Groundnut are in residence at Enclave for seven months until July 31st 2014.

      *Please note Curatorial Timeshare have now left Enclave*

      Read more..

      groundnut 2*Please note Curatorial Timeshare have now left Enclave*

      The Groundnut is a London-based partnership involving Folayemi Brown, Duval Timothy, and Jacob Fodio Todd. We organise events, and produce innovative physical and digital content concerning our mutual interests, specifically revolving around food. We all have mixed African and European heritage and this greatly influences what we do.

      The Groundnut are in residency at Enclave until July 31st 2014.

      thegroundnut@gmail.com
      www.thegroundnut.co.uk

    • lemons groundnut
    • Third Text

      Ongoing

      Third Text is a highly-regarded bi-monthly journal offering critical perspectives on art and culture.

      www.thirdtext.org

      Read more..

      Third Text enclave deptford

      www.thirdtext.org
      thirdtext@btconnect.com

      Third Text has established its key position at the critical interface of contemporary art practice and theory with specific focus on the impact of ‘globalization’. In its twenty-six year history the journal has created an archive of knowledge production to benefit artists, researchers and art historians worldwide.

      Third Text took a pioneering interest in the exclusionary zones of ‘centre’ and ‘periphery’ and challenged Eurocentric and ethnocentric notions inherent to aesthetic criteria that marginalized or neglected the work of culturally diverse contemporary artists. The journal moved on to develop its postcolonial discourse in the direction of institutional critique, and it now seeks to address the complex cultural realities that are emerging and competing for recognition in the globalized artworld.

      The crucial issue today is the critical appraisal of contemporary art in the context of this globalized artworld, without a centre, and yet one where the spectre of neocolonialism is ever present. What are the commercial and institutional forces that are shaping art history today? Who is deciding on the present ‘value’ of art and for which audience?

      Third Text has adapted its goals to the changing conditions of the global artworld but its fundamental aim remains the advancement of contemporary art practice in the context of of the art market and institutional forces that obstruct a truly critical perspective on the reception and evaluation of art.

      Third Text has been instrumental in launching a series of independent art journals: Third Text Asia in Pakistan; Third Text Africa in South Africa, Tercer Texto in Peru, and the forthcoming Terceiro Texto in Brazil. Third Text has also published numerous books on art, under its former Kala Press and current Third Text Publications imprints, and is planning further publications.

      Six issues are published annually, online and in print by Routledge, Taylor & Francis, UK. The journal invites contributions to its special and general issues.

       

    • Third Text May 2013 Enclave Deptford
    • DIVUS London – ‘Kit Shrines’ Hiroe Komai, Neil Zakiewicz

      29/03/2014 - 19/04/2014

      Both Komai and Neil Zakiewicz take us back through 20th century art to the beginnings of modernism, to Constructivism, but these art references pause long around the 1960s and 70s. Both artists make art about the making of art. Both are witty.

      Read more..

       

      Every time I visit Hiroe Komai’s studio I come out seeing the city with new eyes – the Hiroe Komai "Objects 5 - tapes" (2013)flimsiness of buildings,the odd details, the materials of which everything is made. Recently she has shifted from hearchitecture-inspired sculptures to casting small bronzes of objects in her studio. These have proved extremely popular, particularly with other artists. These are what are in this show.

       

      Both Komai and Neil Zakiewicz take us back through 20th century art to the beginnings of modernism, to Constructivism, but these art references pause long around the 1960s and 1970s. Both artists make art about the making of art. Both are witty.

      Zakiewicz’s pieces are of MDF and have hinged wings or flaps of various shapes which can fold down from the sides or from top or bottom. They are spray-painted with the flaps closed, but exhibited with them open, so that the holes and cut-outs in the flaps leave painted shapes on the section underneath. They are like irregularly shaped altarpieces, but downbeat, made with DIY materials. These works are in a tradition with other painters who have made art about the making of paintings. He likes materials and processes to be obvious, not concealed. Their ‘point’ is to reveal the actions which produced them. They ought to be dry but they are far from it. ‘In the end there has to be something to look at,’ he says, ‘something to contemplate,’ and their elegance and allusiveness results in great subtlety. Among the many things he tells me he likes are Tantric paintings – ‘because they have a function.’ He adds, ‘art has always had to do with religion, and really it still does, if it functions as a replacement for it, which I think it does.’ His work’s matter-of-fact approach leads to an idea of possibility.

      Komai’s bronzes are casts of tools and other useful objects in her studio: G-clamps, elastic bands, a hammer and nail, Blu-Tack, rolls of tape, pencils, screwdrivers, scalpels. And as if taking us through the door of the studio, her doorstop. Mostly it is the things she has always used to make sculpture. They are exquisitely crafted – it is hard to believe that their colours are achieved with patination alone. The result is that the making of work itself becomes a subject of the work. And like Zakiewicz’s pieces they really bring with them a number of art-historical references, and beyond that, an idea of the devotion required to make art. She alludes to Mondrian in the boxes she makes to contain the sculptures, the floors of which use his colours: primaries, black and white. Like Zakiewicz’s, her work is funny. It has always relied on a comical contrast of the utopianism and idealism of de Stijl, Russian Constructivism and so on, and contemporary interior decor of the DIY type. But the comedy is wistful and her formal journey is also always towards the contemplative. It’s serious.

       

      All the pieces in this show were made in part by someone else: Komai’s by a bronze caster, Zakiewicz’s by someone whose job it is to spray-paint furniture. But Zakiewicz makes his structures, Komai her moulds. And this collaboration, this giving of instructions, is also part of the work. In 1990 art theorist Michel Giroud wrote that, ‘since the beginning of the 20th century a huge upheaval has broken aesthetic comforts and established definitions, in favour of the beauty of the everyday.’ This is true, and relevant to Komai and Zakiewicz. But the art of the ‘everyday’ also has to deal with the history and nature of art, and where it can, with the things that art has always dealt with, with ideas about the world.

       

      David Lillington, March 2014

       

       

    • ENCLAVE GUEST PROJECTS

      NOW: NO FUN: Seán Cummins / Jo Mitchell / Mark Pearson
      NEXT: Barry Sykes, “It Must Be Told.”

      Read more..

      NOW: NO FUN: Seán Cummins / Jo Mitchell / Mark Pearson
      NEXT: Barry Sykes,“It Must Be Told.”

      -

      NOW: 

      NO FUN: Seán Cummins / Jo Mitchell / Mark Pearson
      Preview March 28th 6-9pm + afterparty
      Exhibition continues to April 19th, open Wed-Sat 12-6pm.

      *NO FUN is part of the Enclave Residency Projects programme*

      Enclave, NO FUN: Seán Cummins Jo Mitchell Mark PearsonNO FUN at Enclave is an installation of work by 3 artists who use and subvert strategies taken from graphic design. They are interested in its wider cultural context or sub-cultural references and enjoy exploring its communicative possibilities and power.

      NO FUN will present wall drawings, tapestries and enlarged photocopied imagery, becoming an immersive, overwhelming and competitive environment of graphic imagery. They intend this installation to be a creative exaggeration of the language and properties of graphic design, using its conventions as a vehicle for enhancing the critical, spontaneous and aberrant urges and intentions of the artists themselves.

      On the surface most graphic design will suggest expressive possibilities that are open ended … but design being design… it is ultimately locked into the functional and rational objectives of communicating and advertising. NO FUN readily employs methodologies of graphic design but their output is joyous, humorous and a little bit freaky which ultimately does mean FUN.

      *

      SEAN CUMMINS writes operating instructions for himself and/or others to make drawings that are then enlarged and painted directly onto the wall. These vibrant “dazzle ships” of eye popping typographic and abstract shape mutations eloquently transcend the conceptual constraints of their origins.

      JO MITCHELL paints murals that incorporate fragmented texts taken from references to underground subcultures. Her work is a constant reclamation and imaging of emotive and symbolic spaces (both real and psychological) that we create for ourselves.

      MARK PEARSON makes giant photocopied tapestries, crass paintings and collages containing low grade imagery and exaggerated perspectival effects subtitled with bombastic straplines.

       

      NEXT

      Barry Sykes
      “It Must Be Told.”
      Preview Friday 25th April
      Installation continues 26th April – 24th May
      Performances Friday 23rd & Saturday 24th May. FREE, booking essential 

      BatteryPoweredCandleBrassLampGlueGunBasketComicSansMarketingGold.jpg
      Courtesy Barry Sykes, 2014.

      BatteryPoweredCandleBrassLampGlueGunBasketComicSansMarketingGold

      Enclave has invited artist Barry Sykes to adapt his performance lecture “It Must Be Told.” into a month-long installation in Guest Projects. Originally commissioned by Arnolfini, Bristol for ‘4 Days: Curtain Call’(2013) “It Must Be Told.” is a work-in-progress dramatisation of Sykes’ ongoing research into a long-running 1980s/1890s ghost play.

      The gallery installation acts as an enigmatic display of this research to date and also the pretext and stage set for a series of talks delivered on the final weekend. Utilising stage directions, makeshift props, PowerPoint, model-making, footnotes, one acting lesson at RADA and 64 near-identical jpegs, Sykes walks us through his fascination with the mechanics of this relentlessly popular production. “It’s the repeated adverts that haunt the local press, the ongoing recasting decisions, the habits, the adjustments, the building that’s heard it recited 10,000 times and the regular-as-clockwork gasps of terror.”

      “It Must Be Told.” also forms part of Sykes’ larger research project, ‘The International Hermit Conference’, a purposefully subjective and scattershot inquiry into the ambiguities of escape and immersion, looking at how we pursue singular ideas, relate to each other and retreat into architecture.

      To conclude this exhibition, Sykes presents a weekend of three live performances of “It Must Be Told.”, each varying slightly due to rewrites, practice and human error:

      The First Night: Friday 23rd May, 7pm
      The Matinee: Saturday 24th May, 3pm
      The End of The Run: Saturday 24th May, 7pm

      The performance lasts 1hr. Book now to reserve your place.

      Barry Sykes is an artist who works across a variety of different media, including sculpture, video, photography, installation, and performance, normally utilising basic or frugal materials and techniques. Often working in direct response to a particular situation, location or person, his practice explores the accommodation of error, quantifying experience, shortfall and absurdity.

      Sykes is currently ICIA Artist in Residence 2013/14 at the University of Bath. Recent solo exhibitions include Recreate a Nervy Pistol? (An Early Retrospective), Plymouth Arts Centre, Plymouth, UK (2011); The Desperate Designer, Gallop, London (Part of the London Design Festival 2009) and I Was Born The Day Heidegger Died (But I Don’t Know Much About His Work), i-cabin, London (2008). Recent events have been presented at Kings ARI, Melbourne (2014); Arnolfini, Bristol (2013); Limoncello, London (2012); The Showroom, London (2012); Spike Island, Bristol (2012); Tate St Ives, Cornwall (2011); Tate Modern, London (2010) and the Immersive Vision Theatre, Plymouth (2011).

    • Enclave, NO FUN: Seán Cummins Jo Mitchell Mark Pearson
    • Disrupt!on, Julien Bayle

      Friday 28th March 2014, starts 7pm sharp. Installation continues to 13th April

      Julien Bayle Disrupt!on
      curated by François Larini
      Performance installation live: Friday 28th March 2014, starts 7pm sharp in London (8pm local time in Monaco)
      Installation in London runs to 13 April 2014

      Read more..

      DISRUPTION Julien BayleJulien Bayle Disrupt!on
      curated by François Larini
      Performance installation live: Friday 28th March 2014, starts 7pm sharp in London (8pm local time in Monaco)
      Installation in London runs to 13 April 2014

      As part of its public programme, the Nouveau Musee National de Monaco –Villa Paloma presents Disrupt!on, a performance installation by Julien Bayle, curated by François Larini (NMNM), which takes place simultaneously and live in Monaco and at news of the world space in London.

      Julien Bayle is a minimalist sound and visual artist working at the juncture of sound, visual and digital data.

      Through successive digitally generated and evolving sequences, Disrupt!on explores the phenomenon of disturbance. It reflects how a deterministic system can produce – through its existence within a wider system and through external interventions – an effect which becomes unpredictable.

      The Disrupt!on performance at Villa Paloma is an electronic piece lasting about 30 minutes exploring and developing all the work’s concepts, producing its sounds and displaying the continuous flow of data. The performer interacts with sound, sometimes changing the low-level parameters of the oscillators, sometimes altering time parameters without ever using a proper tempo, but every time destabilising the very system he created.

      The Disrupt!on installation at news of the world is London is triggered by the start of the live sound/visual performance in Monaco which activates some of the installation’s processes through the internet, using basic communication protocols. The data fed into the algorithms by the artist creates an aural and visual output which, from Monaco, evolves, informed, corrupted and ruptured by audience interaction through social networks as the data travels the net to London. The higher the number of interaction, the greater the unpredictability of the system’s output.

      After the end of the performance in Monaco, the London installation is fully launched, and the stimuli received from the present audience or tele-participant, through Twitter via #blpmc, continue to disrupt the installation, creating glitches, reaction, random events and system degeneration. Each hashtag are sensed and contribute to increase the global installation’s entropy.

      Experimenting with the concept of control vs. chaos both in his installations and live performances, Julien Bayle draws from Richard Artschwager’s “blp” idea, seen as a kind of sudden burst of information within various landscapes.

      In our era of digital sound and cloud computing, the name itself (blp pronounced “blip”) refers to an electronic sound suddenly appearing in our soundscape as a noise, an alarm or a tune… (like Artschwager blp suddenly appears in a landscape). Within a computer and network based audio-visual system, they can be translated into a behavior that would be new, uncanny and disruptive.

      The originals blps – an oblong shape developed by Richard Artschwager in 1967-1968 – were flat painted pieces of wood, but he soon made them from spray paints and stencils, adhesive decals and rubberized hair. In 1971, the exhibition Sonsbeek buiten de perken (Sonsbeek Between Lawn and Order) took place in the Netherlands. Artschwager’s contribution, Utrecht Projekt, consisted of blps installed around the city and a catalogue of photo-documentation showing the blps in urban and rural settings. The catalogue was accompanied by an album that played the sound of a ticking clock on one side and that of a dripping tap on the other. He considered these mundane noises an auditory counterpart to his blps: background sounds that often go unheeded, but which, once noticed, are almost impossible to ignore.

      Friday 28 March 2014, performance starts 7pm sharp (GMT) in London at news of the world, 50 Resolution Way, London SE8 4NT and 8pm sharp local time at Nouveau Musée National de Monaco-Villa Paloma, 56 Boulevard du Jardin Exotique 98000 Monaco. www.nmnm.mc

    • DISRUPTION Julien Bayle
      • NOW... until April 19th, Plants Under Glass, Rachel Pimm. New video and sculpture looking at greenwashing, biomimicry and cultivation in interiors. More info..  NOW... Until April 19th, NO FUN Seán Cummins / Jo Mitchell / Mark Pearson (Enclave Residency Projects) More info..  NEXT... Opening April 25th Detours: After Detournement Jesse Ash / Johan Arens / Simon Bedwell / Sophie Carapetian / Toby Christian / Mike Cooter / Tom Crawford / Frauke Dannert / Nick Downes / Ruth Ewan / Famed / Daniel Griffiths / Mark Hamilton / Rory Macbeth / Neil Mulholland / Kate Owens / Laure Prouvost / Bob And Roberta Smith / Cristopher Kulendran Thomas / Emily Wardill / Rehana Zaman / Curated by Ross Downes. NEXT... Opening April 25th Barry Sykes, "It Must Be Told." - A dramatisation of Sykes' current research into a 1980/1890s ghost play, utilising stage directions, makeshift props and Microsoft PowerPoint. Adapted from a performance lecture originally commissioned by Arnolfini for 4 Days: Curtain Call (September 2013). More info..            

        Enclave OPEN SUBMISSION
        Deadline: ongoing – apply now! 

        Resolution Way gate sign (image Lawrence Lek)We are pleased to announce an opportunity for young or established curators, artists and collectives to submit exhibition proposals or longer term projects/programmes for the Enclave Open Submission Space. We are looking to select a small number of high quality proposals to be programmed over the next ten months and into the future.

        Proposals will be reviewed and selected by the Director Anthony Gross and the Curator Lucy A Sames and will be chosen on artistic merit and critical engagement.

        Download -Enclave Application Pack Feb 2014

        All enquiries to info@EnclaveProjects.com.

        ///////////////////////////////////////////////

        New Studio Development ‘New Studio Development_BrockleyArtist Village’ in Brockley

        Located just off Endwell Road and just by Brockley station. There will be a combination of new shared, open and private studios up to 1000 sq ft each. Each unit is on the first floor, will have a sink, windows, concrete screed floor and heating. There is on-site parking.

        Estimated start date: September 2013
        Viewings: September 2013Contact: Email studios@tempcontemp.co.uk to be added to the contact list.

        /////////////////////////////////////////////////

        Enclave MACHINE PARTY

        Enclave Machine Party Deptford Lucy A Sames Anthony GrossMACHINE PARTY will be open every week Wednesday-Saturday 12-6pm during exhibitions (call 0208 694 1644 to check) for coffee, wifi, hanging out and free work space.

        MACHINE PARTY is the clubroom and command-centre for Enclave operations, it is a flexible infrastructure/hangout with exhibition and performance space, Enclave’s curatorial office, communal working/meeting space, future artist residency module, pop-up charity fundraising speakeasy bar… plus free wifi and cheap coffee.

        Machine Party Enclave Deptford

        MACHINE PARTY is available for hire for parties and one off events. Contact us for info and rates.

      Woodgrain
    • Rachel Pimm, Plants Under Glass

      Preview March 28th 6-9pm, exhibition continues to April 19th

      Rachel Pimm’s new video and sculpture looks at greenwashing, biomimicry and cultivation in interiors.

      Read more..

      Preview Friday March 28th 6-9pm + afterparty
      Exhibition continues to Saturday April 19th
      Open Wednesday to Saturday, 12-6pm

      rachel pimm enclave

      Plants Under Glass re-imagines the facade of the Enclave gallery as the glass of a horticulturist’s greenhouse, or the slide under a biologist’s microscope. Here, Rachel Pimm presents a new body of work around the current technological impacts of cultivating nature out of its original habitat and into our homes, offices, leisure, retail spaces and workplaces. Bringing together maintained captivity, biomimicry, and the popular eco-friendly PR strategy of ‘greenwashing’, a group of sculpture and video works are landscaped to form the palette of a tropical garden ecosystem in the materials of a contemporary interior. In this environment, plants perform living alongside humans, proposing ideas about the future of cultivation and ways in which the new natural behaves.

      Supported by the Arts Council England.

      Print

       

    • Rachel Pimm Plants under Glass Enclave
    • Read more..